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Summer Session
Graduate Courses Summer 2015

Everyone interested in enrolling in a course needs to first email the instructor for permission; let the instructor know whether you are planning to take the course for credit or audit. Click on the instructors name for a link to their email address.

M=Monday, T=Tuesday, W=Wednesday, R=Thursday, F=Friday, S=Saturday, SU=Sunday

MGMT 215-CRN 10002:  Managerial Accounting

Instructor: Mark Bichsel
Class meetings: MW 6:00-8:30pm, S 6/6 10am-2pm and S 6/21 10am-2pm
Summer Session I
Location:
 GSB TBD
Course Description: This course describes and analyzes the tools available for measurement, control, and planning of business firms. Emphasis will be on the accounting of costs in business.


MGMT 280A-CRN 10003:  International Business Consulting

Instructor: Darcelle Lahr
Summer Session I
Class meetings:
 
R 5/21 4-6:30pm, F 5/22 9:30am-3:00pm
R 5/28 4-6:30pm, F 5/29 9:30am-3:00pm
R 6/4 4-6:30pm
R 6/11 4-6:30pm, F 6/12 9:30am-3:00pm
F 6/19 9:30am-3:00pm
F 6/26 9:30am-3:00pm
Location: GSB
Course Description: This course will actively engage students in real-world business challenges and issues within a global business framework.  Student teams will work directly with U.S. organizations with international operations & with international organizations seeking entry into U.S. markets, providing analyses, recommendations, strategies, and assessments critical to the firms’ growth and viability. Former clients have included Saint Harridan, Guayaki, Flextronics and Prefixa International, Inc.  Students will gain a richer global perspective, develop skills in communication across social, cultural and transnational boundaries, and apply sound leadership and decision-making principles in a global environment. 


MGMT 280B-CRN 10004:  Impact Investing

Instructor: Ed QuevedoMartha Sellers
Summer Session I
Class meetings:
 T 6-9:30pm, R 7-9:30pm
Location: GSB
Course Description: This course surveys the principles of impact investing, capital markets, and creation of new investment and financial instruments designed to create blended value and social impact. Investment strategies that create both market rate returns and positive social and environmental impact will be reviewed, as will market instruments at different stages of development in their progress towards placement in institutional investor portfolios. Each topic in the course will feature a guest lecturer practicing in, and contributing to the building of, the impact investing field. Confirmed speakers include representatives from Omidyar Network, Parnassus Investments, Social Capital Markets, RSF Social Finance, and Impact Assets, among others.  Students will complete a research paper on a chosen topic relating to SRI and impact investing.


EDUC 425-CRN 10005:  Intro to Research Design

Instructor: Argelia Lara
Summer Session I
Class meetings:
 MW 5:30-8:30pm
Location: ED 101
Course Description: The course explores the challenges facing those working to design, implement, and evaluate educational policies and programs. Students will deepen their sense of the practical challenges of the policy process and their sense of the roles scholars have and can play in relation to these issues. Attention will also be paid to oral presentations of ideas and facilitation of classroom discussion.


EDUC 280A-CRN 10015: Educational Equity and Opportunity

Instructor: Ingrid Seyer-Ochi
Summer Session I
Class meetings:
 
TR 9:00am-12:10pm
Location: ED 101
Course Description: This course explores our nation’s commitment to “equity and opportunity for all” via philosophical theories of equity and justice, extensive observations and work in Bay Area schools and neighborhoods and theorizing and mapping of “opportunity indicators” in these spaces. Student work for the course will include a) the development of philosophical equity frameworks; b) “applying” these frameworks to lived spaces by engaging youth and community members in dialogue around the frameworks’ meaning, relevance and possibilities; and c) neighborhood- and school-based mapping projects that document the distribution of opportunity across the Bay Area.


EDUC 280B-CRN 10017: Narrative Ways of Knowing

Instructor: Diane Ketelle and Rebecca Heston
Summer Session I
Class meetings:
 
TR 9:00am-12:10pm
Location: ED 207
Course Description: This class will be organized by the idea that narrative writing is a distinct form of expression. Skill in it may be learned by the thoughtful application of rhetorical and narrative theories as well as creative nonfiction best practices that create rich, evocative stories out of personal experiences, innovative research, and ethnographic field notes.  Inherent to this form of writing is “self-reflexivity,” which demands that the critical lens turned outward is also turned inward, and questions about the writer’s standpoint, way of seeing the world, and interest in the topic are thoroughly explored.  Only if readers trust the narrator will they also learn to trust the narrator’s story. In this six week summer course students will be supported as they learn about narrative forms of knowing and research and how to write stories from their lives or the field.


EDUC 280C-CRN 10018: Survey Design and Development for Social Change

Instructor: Tomás Galguera
Summer Session I
Class meetings: TR 5:30 pm–8:30 pm
Location: TBD
Course Description: Survey Design and Development for Social Sciences is a proposed 2015 Summer Session course on survey design, development, and implementation for research in education and social sciences. In this course, students will collaborate developing a survey on a contemporary topic of interest to the group. After jointly drafting a research question, students will follow a series of steps to evaluate the reliability and internal, external, and construct validity of Likert-scale items. Students will also draft, test, and refine open-ended items to create an instrument that exemplifies a mixed-methods approach to research. In addition to collaborating to write survey items, students will be expected to recruit representative samples of respondents necessary to complete two cycles of survey piloting and development. Once the reliability and validity scores for individual items and the overall reliability score for the instrument reach acceptable levels, students will collect a dataset to answer the research question. The course requirements include collaborating in the creation, development, and implementation of the survey and writing a summary of findings emerging from analyses of the final dataset. The course assumes basic statistics knowledge. 


EDUC 280D-CRN 10016: From Viewing to Doing: Supporting Early Learning (PreK-3rd grade) with Media and Technology

Instructor: Julie Nicholson, Savitha Moorthy and Carlin Llorente
Summer Session I
Class meetings:
 TR 5:30 pm–8:30 pm
Location: ED 101
Course Description: This course will draw from empirical research studies and policy documents to unpack what exactly it means to integrate digital media into early learning experiences in developmentally appropriate ways. Designed Joint Engagements with Media (DJEM)—planned interactions between adults and children and among children—will be an explicit focus of the course. Readings and discussions will examine how early childhood education teachers can use media to catalyze children’s participation in talk and lay the foundation for engagement in disciplinary practices, as well as how media-rich experiences can be combined with other familiar learning formats such as hands-on activities and book readings to create a cohesive learning experience for children. We will explore the purposes for which media can be used in early childhood education classrooms, the conditions under which the use of media can support positive learning outcomes for young children, and the implications for curriculum design and teacher professional development.

 EDUC 425-CRN 10005:  Intro to Research Design

Instructor: Argelia Lara
Summer Session I
Class meetings:
 
MW 5:30-8:30pm
Location: ED 101
Course Description: The course explores the challenges facing those working to design, implement, and evaluate educational policies and programs. Students will deepen their sense of the practical challenges of the policy process and their sense of the roles scholars have and can play in relation to these issues. Attention will also be paid to oral presentations of ideas and facilitation of classroom discussion.


EDUC 480-CRN 10009: Narrative Ways of Knowing

Instructor: Diane Ketelle and Rebecca Heston
Summer Session I
Class meetings:
 TR 9:00am-12:10pm
Location: ED 207
Course Description: This class will be organized by the idea that narrative writing is a distinct form of expression. Skill in it may be learned by the thoughtful application of rhetorical and narrative theories as well as creative nonfiction best practices that create rich, evocative stories out of personal experiences, innovative research, and ethnographic field notes.  Inherent to this form of writing is “self-reflexivity,” which demands that the critical lens turned outward is also turned inward, and questions about the writer’s standpoint, way of seeing the world, and interest in the topic are thoroughly explored.  Only if readers trust the narrator will they also learn to trust the narrator’s story. In this six week summer course students will be supported as they learn about narrative forms of knowing and research and how to write stories from their lives or the field.


ENG 280A-CRN 10006: Creative Writing Bootcamp

Instructor: David Buuck
Summer Session II
Class meetings:
 TR 1:00-4:10pm
Location: MILLS HALL 318
Course Description: One of the hardest--and hardest to teach--challenges for the creative writer, especially in a time of multiple other obligations and distractions, is simply to find and commit the time to focused, productive work. This summer course is thus designed to help writers produce new work, with collective feedback and support, not to privilege productivity for its own sake but to push ourselves and our writing in new directions. Whether you are working on your thesis, beginning a new work, writing poetry, fiction, creative nonfiction, or young adult fiction, we'll design a game plan for the summer, with the goal of producing at least 50 pages of new writing in our time together. This will be a challenging, writing-intense workshop, but also structured to provide mutual support, feedback, and encouragement in each of our unique practices, sot hat writing can be the rewarding, enjoyable, and focused work we all want it to be. Additionally, the instructor pledges to do al of the assignments with you, including the minimum pages of writing. After all, we're in this together as writers, and we all can learn from each other's struggles and breakthroughs!

ENG 280B-CRN 10008: The Digital Newsroom

Instructor: Meredith May
Summer Session II
Class meetings:
 MW 1:00-4:10pm
Location: RC 133
Course Description: The Digital Newsroom summer class at Mills will teach students the latest digital media practices along with the bedrock skills of newswriting. Students will choose a topic or several topics that are currently in the news, and work collaboratively to build an interactive WordPress website to showcase the work of the class. Students will report using videos, slideshows, podcasts, blogs and written magazine-style pieces all anchored to the class website. Readings will consist of a series of online digital storytelling courses by Poynter Institute on Media Studies. Leading Bay Area digital journalists, including San Francisco Chronicle video and social media producers, will visit the class to lend their expertise.

ENG 280D-CRN 10011: Online Writing Workshop

Instructor: Achy Obejas
Summer Session II
Class meetings:
 Online
Location: Online
Course Description: Don't want to lose your writing momentum during the summer? Traveling and just generally not coming to campus but still want feedback on work-in-progress (fiction or creative nonfiction) from an intimate community of writers? Join this online writing group, where you can participate in workshop discussions as your individual schedule permits, rather than during preset class times. I'll give feedback and facilitate online discussion of the manuscripts on Blackboard. No readings, exercises, or other outside work. The focus is entirely on workshop discussion of student writing. Prior workshop experience is strongly recommended.

 

Last Updated: 3/11/15